The Dunya Series

The Dunya Series

And what is the dunya [worldly life], except the enjoyment of delusion? (Qur’an 57:20)

For over a year, we at Zujaja interviewed dozens of interesting and opiniated American Muslims of all shapes, sizes, colors, and facial hair on “dunyawi” topics: fashion, art, relationships, and more. What did we end up with? A vibrant collection of distinct voices.

Who are we being fashionable for? What if all Muslim men and women wore pretty much the same thing, something like a standard “uniform” for Muslims? Do modern Western contexts cause Muslims to accentuate their individuality rather over their collective identity? Why do you think this is? Would you let a hijabi fashionista be a role model for your daughter?

Muslim Fashion is Flourishing. And the pace doesn’t seem to be slowing down any time soon. Valued at nearly $100 billion (with a b) dollars, it’s clear that many Muslim women are seeing little, if any, conflict between modesty and keepin’ it mad fresh. But what’s at stake? Is there too much glitz and glamour and not enough dhikr and fikr? We spoke to a diverse group of Muslim women on the issue, from supermodels, to niqabis, to everything in between. The first topic of the dunya series is on the way western Muslims are navigating new fashions, while trying to retain a level of mandated modesty. Is it possible to be modest and fashionable? Are there limits?

There is also an extended (25 minutes) version of the documentary here.

Questions to Think About

Fashion

Who are we being fashionable for?
What if all Muslim men and women wore pretty much the same thing, something like a standard “uniform” for Muslims?
Do modern Western contexts cause Muslims to accentuate their individuality rather over their collective identity? Why do you think this is?
Would you let a hijabi fashionista be a role model for your daughter?

Art

Is there any way to just let a Muslim artist speak on his or her own?
Said otherwise, how can Muslim Americans prevent the politicization of their identity in the public sphere?
What kinds of effects does the burden of representing the world’s single largest religionhave on Muslim artists? Does it make them better? Worse?
Can we criticize Muslim artists without feeling as if we’re bringing down “one of our own”? Should we?
Where are Muslim artists’ creative energies most needed?

Marriage

Who’s to blame for the marriage crisis in the American Muslim community? Men? Women? Family expectations? Something else?
How well do you have to know someone before you consider marrying?
How closely do you look towards your parents’ marriage as instructive for your future relationships?

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *